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Creating Biodiversity By: Stacey Wildberger

“Examine each question in terms of what is ethically and esthetically right, as well what is economically expedient.  A thing is right when it tends to preserve the integrity, stability and beauty of the biotic community. It is wrong when it tends otherwise.”  –Aldo Leopold. A Sand County Almanac

Have you ever considered your backyard as the last chance to sustain nature, create biodiversity and provide habitat? Or what your role is in preserving the natural world for future generations? We have a responsibility to be good stewards of our landscapes.

Our lawns, gardens and common spaces have always been expected to be a place of beauty, relaxation and an expression of ourselves and that the natural world existed somewhere else. Doug Tellamy, author of Bringing Nature Home states ” We have always thought that biodiversity was happy somewhere out there in nature.”  We were never taught that species are disappearing everyday from our world and how their disappearance affects our own well-being.

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Host Plants for Butterflies

By Stacey Wildberger – January 2017

Everyone has heard about the decline of our most iconic butterfly, the Monarch due to loss of habitat, insecticide use, predation, climate change and a major decline in their host plant-milkweed due to wide spread herbicide use. Milkweed is the only plant a monarch can lay their eggs.  What many people don’t realize is that most butterflies require a specific plant to lay their eggs on. These plants are known as host plants and they provide food for the caterpillar.  While it is important to plant lots of nectar plants for the adult butterfly it is just as important to plant hosts plants for the babies!

Butterflies require several things to raise their young and survive as adults- host plants to lay their eggs, water source for puddling and receiving nutrients and finally nectar plants to sustain themselves in adulthood. We are going to look at the many plants you can add to your gardens to provide a nursery for our Lepidoptera. Read More

Oyster Habitat Interview with Larry Jennings

By: Stacey Wildberger – November 2016

Our community recently partnered with Biohabitats to come up with a plan to restore our beaches so that residents will be able to enjoy them for many years to come. We are fortunate to have water privileges such as community beaches, fishing piers, boat docks and the beautiful wildlife that comes with those areas. We have witnessed over the last 25 years erosion of our beaches from Lake Claire to Little Magothy to Main Beach. Now is the time to take action before the damage is irreversible.
Biohabitats presented concepts for all the sights in the community where action is needed—for a total of 7 project sites. The next step is for Biohabitats and the community to work with various state and county offices to see which of the concepts are feasible and what if any financial help we can expect to receive. The CSCIA board wants input form the community as well. The presentation from Biohabits was videotaped and is currently available for viewing on the CSCIA website.  CSCIA is asking for your comments and feedback.

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Backyard Birding

By: Stacey Wildberger – October 2016

There are many reasons people choose to feed birds and create bird-friendly habitats in their own backyards: from aesthetics, connecting children with nature, and conservation, or just personal enjoyment of birds. While placing a few feeders around your yard is a good start, birds require more than just seed provided in a feeder. They need food, water, shelter and “greening”.

Did you know that 96% of birds rely on insects to raise their young, and it takes more than 5,000 caterpillars to raise one clutch of chickadees?! By growing native plants you can provide the needed food for adults as well as baby birds. Where do all those caterpillars come from that are needed to feed birds’ young? There are many native trees that support hundreds of species of caterpillars and other insects. Oaks support over 500 species of caterpillars, cherries and willows support over 450 species of caterpillars, and birches support over 400 species. Many native shrubs produce fruits that birds love, including blueberries, viburnums, chokeberry, hollies and winterberries.

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Re-Thinking Your Fall Chores

By: Stacey Wildberger – September 2016

It seems like just yesterday I was anxiously waiting spring and the new growth of the garden, the buds bursting forth, and the beautiful blooms opening and now suddenly fall is right around the corner. What better time to start thinking about fall cleanup in the garden and around the yard, but STOP-not so fast on some of those traditional garden chores. If you want to create ecofriendly yards that sustain wildlife, support biodiversity and protect our pollinators there are some simple things you can do to help.

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